Center for Educational Access provides for disabled students

William Bowden | Lemke Newsroom

The Center for Educational Access (CEA) provides assistance technology for disabled students and students who want to improve their classroom experience.

Communicating the availability of technology to students has been a founding principle, CEA Associate Director Heidi A. Scher said.
“Out ultimate goal is to improve the access of knowledge for all students who need aid,” Scher said.
The available technology ranges from simple magnification software to complex speech to text translators.
“Our technology is designed to lessen the gap between the student and whatever the student wants to learn,” she said.

A portable package available at the CEA. It includes essential equipment for students who are visually or hearing impaired. This package, which contains around $5000 of equipment, is available to any student that requests it.

A portable package available at the CEA. It includes essential equipment for students who are visually or hearing impaired. This package, which contains around $5000 of equipment, is available to any student that requests it.

A Victor WAVE is an audio-text reader that replaces or supplements textbooks. The CEA staff converts requested documents to an mp3 format that can be burnt to a CD or stored digitally. The WAVE is able to locate individual chapters, pages, and words that is stored in the digital information.

A Victor WAVE is an audio-text reader that replaces or supplements textbooks. The CEA staff converts requested documents to an mp3 format that can be burnt to a CD or stored digitally. The WAVE is able to locate individual chapters, pages, and words that is stored in the digital information.

A Victor Daisy is a more advanced version of the WAVE that is able to store more data and can sort through scientific and mathematic texts with a greater efficiency. Shortcut keys can be used to identify what part of the text is a problem and a corresponding answer in the text can be linked to the problem.

A Victor Daisy is a more advanced version of the WAVE that is able to store more data and can sort through scientific and mathematic texts with a greater efficiency. Shortcut keys can be used to identify what part of the text is a problem and a corresponding answer in the text can be linked to the problem.

Listen is an audio amplification device and is the most commonly distributed item at the CEA. One device is given to an instructor and the other to the student; it provides amplified sound for the individual student and can be set on multiple frequencies to provide different levels of volume for different students.

Listen is an audio amplification device and is the most commonly distributed item at the CEA. One device is given to an instructor and the other to the student; it provides amplified sound for the individual student and can be set on multiple frequencies to provide different levels of volume for different students.

TypeWell Education Transcription started as a basic text magnification for visually impaired students. However, newer versions provided by the CEA can convert audio into text with minimal delay.

TypeWell Education Transcription started as a basic text magnification for visually impaired students. However, newer versions provided by the CEA can convert audio into text with minimal delay.